Skip to content

Indigenous Student Resources

Acknowledging the territory in which a gathering takes place is a demonstration of respect for Indigenous Peoples. Land acknowledgements are offered to recognize Indigenous peoples’ enduring connection to their traditional territories, to recognize the history of the land that is currently shared by many peoples, and to recognize that the lands on which we gather are to be cared for as a shared responsibility of all those who reside in a territory.

As communities, individuals and organizations search for collective healing and work toward reconciliation, many individuals and organizations are seeking to implement meaningful acts of change to contribute to the process. Academy Canada incorporates land acknowledgement as a meaningful act in which our institutions can contribute to the reconciliation process.

The lands that we study on, benefit from, and where our campuses are located have been occupied, managed, and governed since time immemorial by Indigenous peoples. There is a tradition of knowing, teaching, and learning on this land that goes beyond the histories of Academy Canada, Eastern Academy and settler education.

It is an Indigenous practice to acknowledge the land and territory which you are on. When Indigenous Peoples visited other Indigenous Peoples, they acknowledged their territories.

Land acknowledgements are a way to recognize and respect the Original Peoples of the territory upon which our campuses are situated. Land acknowledgements are a way to share space with Indigenous Peoples by incorporating protocols into our college procedures. Land acknowledgements prompt us to think about relationships between Indigenous Peoples and institutions. They are a means of creating awareness of Indigenous presence and land rights in everyday life.

When Should a Land Acknowledgement be Used?

Land acknowledgements must be done respectfully and with purpose and meaning in the following procedures:

  • A written territory acknowledgement can be used on course syllabi, email signatures, websites, and job postings.
  • Territory acknowledgements can be delivered at all in person and virtual events including the first day of class, orientation, graduation/convocation, staff meetings, professional development sessions, workshops, and conferences.
  • It should happen at the beginning of the event, regardless of the size of the gathering, and independent of the presence of Indigenous people.
  • The acknowledgement should be delivered by the event organizer, and it should be done by a non-Indigenous person. While Indigenous people can provide a territory acknowledgement, it is more appropriate for an Indigenous individual to offer an opening prayer or words of welcome.
  • The acknowledgement should never be rushed, and should not be skipped if an event is running late. It must be prioritized and given adequate time and respectful attention from the audience.
  • Learn how to correctly pronounce unfamiliar words before delivering an acknowledgement

Land Acknowledgements by Location

St. John's Campuses:

We respectfully acknowledge the territory in which we gather as the ancestral homelands of the Beothuk, and the island of Newfoundland as the ancestral homelands of the Mi’kmaq and Beothuk. We would also like to recognize the Inuit of Nunatsiavut and NunatuKavut and the Innu of Nitassinan, and their ancestors, as the original people of Labrador. We strive for respectful relationships with all the peoples of this province as we search for collective healing and true reconciliation and honour this beautiful land together.

Corner Brook Campus:

We respectfully acknowledge that the land on which we gather is in traditional Mi’kmaw territory, and we acknowledge with respect the diverse histories and cultures of the Beothuk, Mi’kmaq, Innu, and Inuit of this province.

Labrador Campus:

We acknowledge that the lands and waters on which we gather are the homelands of the Innu and Inuit of Labrador, and recognize their ancestral and continued ties to these lands and waters.Labrador Campus:Virtual Spaces & ABE Sites (Deer Lake, St. Anthony, Baie Verte, Placentia, Bonavista, Conception Bay South, Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Sheshatshiu, Natuashish, Hopedale, Nain, Labrador West):

Virtual Spaces & ABE Sites (Deer Lake, St. Anthony, Baie Verte, Placentia, Bonavista, Conception Bay South, Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Sheshatshiu, Natuashish, Hopedale, Nain, Labrador West):

We acknowledge that the lands on which Academy Canada’s campuses are situated are in the traditional territories of diverse Indigenous groups, and we acknowledge with respect the diverse histories and cultures of the Beothuk, Mi’kmaq, Innu, and Inuit of this province.

 

This virtual space land acknowledgement is intended to reflect our institution’s presence across all campuses throughout the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. This acknowledgement is appropriate for use in virtual spaces, such as online learning, Adult Basic Education satellite campuses, and online events, when students and staff come together virtually from across the province and multiple campuses. This acknowledgement can also be used by staff members in email signatures, in course offerings in our learning management system, World Classroom Brightspace, and on the Academy Canada and Eastern Academy websites.

Phonetic Pronunciation of the Indigenous Peoples Acknowledged in the Suggested Land Acknowledgements
Picture1
Scroll To Top